Where’s the album already?

… You might ask, as I do myself every single day. Turns out making records is not as easy as it sounds, who knew? In the last update I mentioned Alex (sound engineer) who started mixing the album in October. Things dragged in December and January and Alex left to tour with his band in the last month or so. Musicians go on tour, who knew? Alex is now back and will commence working on the mix WHEN his new computer arrives. Kill me 🙂

Meanwhile, my dear friend Richard is (still) editing the majestic new music video for one of the tracks from the new album. Obviously, we won’t be able to release the music video if the song is not mixed and mastered yet. Having said that, I still haven’t seen a single second from the edits, but Richard is being optimistic and said “it’s really worth the wait” (his words).
The music video should be done by the end of March. <– See what I did there Richard? …. Richard? …. Wake up Richard.

This post is totally not a distraction to make you forget that I still have to finish working on the album cover and artwork. What’s with 2018? Did the government spray some laziness chemicals in the air or something?

Illuminati Confirmed!

Crap, I almost forgot!

My music is now on a new platform called Musicoin. Yes, it’s one of those crypto-currency (digital currency, Bitcoin) thingies; and if you don’t know what Bitcoin is, make sure you include the location of the rock you live under in your mailing address, at least you’ll get the new CD when it’s out; not sure what you’ll do with it though. 🙂

So, why Musicoin?

Unlike Spotify, or other similar industry giants who are destroying the music industry, Musicoin actually pays the artist 1 $MUSIC by a Pay-Per-Play (PPP) smart contract, and the best part is, you (the listener) don’t pay anything out of your pocket. So, who pays the artist? Miners (Mind you, they’re not human miners). And who pays the miners? Miners solve computational work to mine $MUSIC and they get paid for their work by the Musicoin ecosystem. Pretty smart, eh?

The numbers, what do they mean?

1 $MUSIC is currently worth 2.5 cents, Spotify claims that their average pay per stream is $0.007 which is a flat out lie, the real number is around $0.004 (that’s less than a cent, not even half a cent) which is also the average pay per play for other streaming platforms like Apple or Amazon etc… HINT: If you’re listening on Spotify, you’re not paying the artist, you’re paying the millionaires.

But what do I know?

Here’s my Musicoin page https://musicoin.org/nav/artist/0x89a42ed7a1367…

Go listen to some music and support artists directly.

I hope I’ll be back with better news next time

-Shant

Controversial Quote From Steven Wilson

In a recent interview Steven Wilson said:

I’d rather hear Dave Gilmour playing one note and break my heart, than hearing Joe Satriani playing 300 notes and not touch me in any way at all.

I agree with that, but not fully. The only part I disagree with is “Joe Satriani”. I think he just picked the wrong guitarist.

And to those wondering if he really said that. Yep, he actually did…

I’ve said it before, I’m going to say it again, Music is art, not a competition.

Definition of Prog

One of my fans Andrew Grabowska is writing a speech about progressive rock and metal for his class, he chose me as his source and I’m quite honored.

He wanted answers to some of his questions:

  1. Why do you listen to/enjoy progressive metal and rock?
  2. Why did you chose to write and play it?
  3. Is there anything else you think is important about progressive rock and metal in comparison to other genres?

Well, below was my reply.

I started playing guitar when I was 15, and we played and covered a diversity of metal songs from different bands with my previous band Nu.Clear.Dawn.

At some point I was almost finding heavy metal sounding a bit boring to me, specially the standard song structures, verse chorus verse chorus solo chorus, also the regular guitar chords. I mean don’t get me wrong here, there are a lot of great metal bands out there that I enjoyed playing and listening to and still do sometimes, Iron Maiden, Metallica, Scorpions, Whitesnake, Black Sabbath, Zeppelin, Judas Priest, Iced Earth.. The is pretty much endless but still something was missing for me, perhaps the fun factor.

When I first got into prog, it was mostly Dream Theater and Rush that I listened to, and what got me into Dream Theater was Pink Floyd, when Dream Theater covered for Pink Floyd in A Change of Seasons, and how I got into Pink Floyd is quite the story.

Now why do I enjoy listening to prog? The song structures are different, sometimes there’s no chorus at all, sometimes very short lyrics, sometimes long intros, so there’s always the element of surprise, the music is diverse as well, different melodies, different moods, different builds in one track, odd time signatures, and of course some tracks are long which allows for instrumental sections, I just love how everyone in the band could get to solo at some point, in the end the band is not only the singer and then the rest of the band. It’s the singer, the guitarist, the drummer, the bassist, and everyone has their moment to shine.

It pretty much goes the same when it comes to writing and playing progressive music, plus, playing progressive rock is a lot of fun it’s almost like a video game, as a guitarist your left hand and fingers need to move around and hit the right notes on the fretboard while your brain is getting ready to play the next part in the song which is completely a new section, and it keeps progressing!
The chords sound a lot wider, jazzy, each position gives you a different mood, unlike the regular power chord that’s pretty much what every metal song is made of, why play the same four boring chords over and over and wait for the song to be over?

The same applies to everyone else in the band, the drummer has to remember all these odd time signatures and not mess up, and that’s where the fun is. Playing 4/4 time signature gets very old specially for a drummer. When you’re playing a progressive song you have to keep going, the band keeps going, the song keeps going and the melodies and harmonies unite to create an epic song. If you mess up you’re back to the last checkpoint, and keep practicing until you can play the whole thing in one shot, like a pro!

A lot of people think that playing prog is very hard. I almost thought the same, before I first picked up my guitar and tried to play a Dream Theater song, lucky for me I had the transcribed notes and guitar tabs for the song, so I started to learn the parts and I was surprised how extremely easy and fun some sections were to play, despite how difficult they sounded. (Check out guitar tabs and jam tracks from Solipsistic)

You don’t have to be a highly technical musician to play progressive rock or progressive metal, and all new prog bands are missing the point nowadays, they put everything they know in one song, like showing off their muscles.

Music is NOT a race, music is NOT a competition, music is art.

Now tell me why do YOU like prog?

Shant